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Myron Noodleman Becomes Clown Prince of Baseball


MYRON NOODLEMAN



Tulsan Myron Noodleman, a baseball entertainment mainstay since 1992, known as “The World’s Funniest Nerd,” received the ceremonial honor of Clown Prince of Baseball in November during the fourth Veeck Promotional Seminar at the Hilton Head Marriott Beach and Golf Resort in Hilton Head, South Carolina.

Mike Veeck bestowed the honor upon Noodleman when he performed for the general session.

One of the most-booked traveling acts in the country, Noodleman is the fourth Clown Prince in a long lineage of baseball and entertainment royalty.

His three-piece suit with high waters, slick moves and creative dances with players, coaches, umpires, and fans have caught the attention of young and old alike.

The last to reign was Max Patkin, who was appointed Clown Prince by Mike’s father, Hall of Fame promotional legend Bill Veeck. Patkin began his big league career performing for Veeck’s teams to help build attendance. He would coach first base in his trademark over-sized uniform, entertaining crowds for 50 years before his retirement in 1995.

When asked who should be the person to choose the next Clown Prince, Bill Veeck’s former General Manager Roland Hemond replied “Mike Veeck.”

Walter Arlington “Arlie” Latham was the first Clown Prince. His antics included firecrackers under third base, candle lighting in the dugout and on-field acrobatics a century before Ozzie Smith.

Next in line was Al Schacht whose costume consisted of baseball uniform pants, a battered top hat and tattered tuxedo tails coat.

Noodleman, a former math teacher at Union High School, is among a group of zany sports entertainers affiliated with Tulsa-based SRO Productions. Jon Terry, president of SRO, is among the vendors who were present for the seminar’s fully integrated trade show. The trade show featured leaders in the areas of promotional items, manufacturing, service industry, and many others.

The three-day seminar featured distinguished sports marketing professionals in a “hands on” atmosphere. From keynote presentations to interactive breakout forums, the seminar offered a wide array of topics in an environment that reflects Veeck’s “Fun Is Good” motto.

The fourth Veeck Promotional Seminar was presented by Melrose Pyrotechnics, HOK Sport+Event+Venue, Daktronics, and Baseball America.

Attendees were introduced to Mike Veeck’s “Fun is Good” attitude—a concept that has developed into his upcoming “Fun is Good” book, co-authored with Pete Williams. The book will be released April 11, 2005.

Seminar attendees received the most sought-after sports collectible this year, the Grady Little bobble-arm doll. As seen in the June 7 issue of Sports Illustrated, the Grady Little bobble-arm doll was originally scheduled as a Brockton Rox promotional giveaway that was cancelled due to negative fan feedback. Its appearance in Sports Illustrated created an instantaneous collectible market for the doll.

For information on Myron Noodleman, please contact Jon Terry at 492-2503, or by e-mail at jonterry@swbell.net.

Updated 11-24-2004

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